Posts for: March, 2021

By General, Cosmetic, Implant Dentistry
March 30, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: sealants  

Protect your child’s back teeth from cavities with the help of sealants.

Did you know that one-third of children starting school have tooth decay? Decay is one of the most common dental issues our Yonkers, NY, dentists Dr. Fedele Vero, Dr. Christine Fumo, and Dr. Alec Ganci see in children. Along with proper oral hygiene and visiting our dental team twice a year for checkups, dental sealants may also reduce your child’s risk of developing cavities.

What are dental sealants?

To understand how a sealant works you first need to know what it is and what it does. Sealants are little clear or tooth-colored plastic coatings that provide a barrier for the chewing surfaces of your child’s back teeth. This dental material is used to cover the grooves and depressions of the molars and premolars, which are often more susceptible to decay than other areas of a tooth.

Why are dental sealants necessary?

While your child doesn’t necessarily need dental sealants, your Yonkers, NY, family dentist will most likely recommend that children get them. Sealants are an easy, painless, and non-invasive way to provide your child’s smile with a little added protection against decay. Once dental sealants are painted onto the chewing surfaces and then sealed to the tooth with a special light, they can last up to 10 years before needing to be replaced.

Dental sealants are placed as soon as your child’s first molars erupt, which is typically around 6-7 years old. Once your child’s second set of molars erupt, between 11-12 years old, you’ll want them to have sealants placed again. While sealants are quite durable, your child’s six-month checkups will allow our dental team to continue to monitor the strength, durability, and health of the sealant. If the sealant cracks or falls out, we can easily replace it at your child’s routine cleaning.

Whether you have questions about getting dental sealants for your little one or you need to schedule their six-month cleaning, our Yonkers, NY, family dentists Dr. Vero, Dr. Fumo, and Dr. Ganci are here to serve you and your child’s smile needs. Call us today at (914) 476-0100 to schedule an appointment.


By General, Cosmetic, Implant Dentistry
March 24, 2021
Category: Oral Health
WhatTaraLipinskiDoestoProtectOneofHerMostValuableAssets-HerSmile

Tara Lipinski loves to smile. And for good reason: The Olympic-gold medalist has enjoyed a spectacular career in ladies' figure skating. Besides also winning gold in the U.S. Nationals and the Grand Prix Final, in 1997 Lipinski became the youngest skater ever to win a World Figure Skating title. Now a sports commentator and television producer, Lipinski still loves to show her smile—and counts it as one of her most important assets. She also knows the importance of protecting her smile with daily hygiene habits and regular dental care.

Our teeth endure a lot over our lifetime. Tough as they are, though, they're still vulnerable to disease, trauma and the effects of aging. To protect them, it's essential that we brush and floss every day to remove bacterial plaque—that thin accumulating film on teeth most responsible for tooth decay and gum disease.

To keep her smile in top shape and reduce her chances of dental disease, Lipinski flosses and brushes daily, the latter at least twice a day. She also uses a tongue scraper, a small handheld device about the size of a toothbrush, to remove odor-causing bacteria and debris from the tongue.

Lipinski is also diligent about visiting the dentist for professional cleanings and checkups at least twice a year because even a dedicated brusher and flosser like her can still miss dental plaque that can then harden into tartar. Dental hygienists have the training and tools to clear away any lingering plaque and tartar that could increase your disease risk. It's also a good time for the dentist to check your teeth and gums for any developing problems.

The high pressure world of competitive figure skating and now her media career may also have contributed to another threat to Lipinski's smile: a teeth-grinding habit. Teeth grinding is the unconscious action—often while asleep—of clenching the jaws together and producing abnormally high biting forces. Often a result of chronic stress, teeth grinding can accelerate tooth wear and damage the gum ligaments attached to teeth. To help minimize these effects, Lipinski's dentist created a custom mouthguard to wear at night. The slick plastic surface of the guard prevents the teeth from generating any damaging biting forces when they clench together.

The importance of an attractive smile isn't unique to celebrities and media stars like Tara Lipinski. A great smile breeds confidence for anyone—and it can enhance your career, family and social relationships. Protect this invaluable asset with daily oral hygiene, regular dental visits and prompt treatment for disease or trauma.

If you would like more information about protecting your smile, please contact us or schedule an appointment. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Tooth Decay” and “Teeth Grinding.”


By General, Cosmetic, Implant Dentistry
March 14, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: osteoporosis  
CertainDrugsforOsteoporosisCouldImpactYourDentalCare

Osteoporosis is a serious bone weakening disease in older adults that can turn a minor fall into a major bone fracture. But the condition could also impact dental treatment—triggered ironically by the drugs used to treat osteoporosis rather than the disease itself.

From the Latin for “porous bone,” osteoporosis causes bone to gradually lose mineral structure. Over time the naturally-occurring spaces between mineralized portions of the bone enlarge, leaving it weaker as a result.

Although there's no definitive cure for osteoporosis, a number of drugs developed over the last couple of decades can inhibit its progress. Most fall into two major categories, bisphosphonates and RANKL inhibitors.

These drugs work by inhibiting the normal growth cycle of bone. Living bone constantly changes as cells called osteoblasts produce new bone. A different type, osteoclasts, clear away older bone to make room for these newer cells. The drugs selectively destroy osteoclasts so that the older bone, which would have been removed by them, remains for a longer period of time.

Retaining older cells longer initially slows the disease process. But there is a downside: in time, this older bone kept in place continues to weaken and lose vitality. In rare instances it may eventually become detached from its blood supply and die, resulting in what is known as osteonecrosis.

Osteonecrosis mostly affects two particular bones in the body: the femur (the long bone in the upper leg) and the jawbone. In regard to the latter, even the stress of chewing could cause osteonecrosis in someone being treated for osteoporosis. It can also occur after tooth extractions or similar invasive procedures.

If you're taking a bisphosphonate or RANKL inhibitor, you'll want to inform your dentist so that the necessary precautions can be taken before undergoing dental work more invasive than routine cleanings or getting a filling or crown.  If you need major dental work, your dentist or you will also need to speak with your physician about stopping the drug for a few months before and after a dental procedure to minimize the risk of osteonecrosis.

Fortunately, the risk for dental problems while undergoing treatment for osteoporosis is fairly low. Still, you'll want to be as prepared as possible so that the management of your osteoporosis doesn't harm your dental health.

If you would like more information on osteoporosis and dental health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Osteoporosis Drugs & Dental Treatment.”


By General, Cosmetic, Implant Dentistry
March 04, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: dentures  
HelpYourDenturesandYourHealthbyTakingThemOutatNight

Dentures have come a long way since George Washington's time. Today, they're more comfortable, more secure and more lifelike than our first president's famous hippopotamus ivory appliance.

But one thing hasn't changed: Dentures still require regular care and cleaning. And one of the best things you can do for both your dentures and your health is to take them out at night when you go to bed.

Modern dentures are often so comfortable to wear, it's easy to forget you have them in your mouth. But setting a daily habit of taking them out when you turn in for the night will help you avoid a few potential problems.

For one, wearing dentures 24/7 can increase your risk for both oral and general diseases. Constant denture wear can cause greater accumulations of dental plaque, a thin biofilm responsible for gum disease and inflammation. The increase in bacteria could also make you more susceptible to pneumonia and other diseases.

Wearing your dentures non-stop can also worsen bone loss, a common problem associated with dentures. Normally, the biting forces generated when we chew stimulate bone growth in the jaw. A person loses much of this stimulation when they lose teeth, resulting in gradual bone loss.

Dentures can't replace this lost stimulation, and the pressure they exert on the jaw's bony ridges they rest upon can accelerate the process of bone loss. In time, any bone loss could affect the denture's fit as the bone beneath them gradually shrinks. By taking them out at night, you can help slow the pace of bone loss.

In addition to giving them and your mouth a rest at night, be sure you're also keeping your dentures clean: Take them out and rinse them off after meals and brush them with a small amount of antibacterial soap (not toothpaste) at least once a day. And don't forget to brush your gums and tongue every day with a soft toothbrush (different from your denture brush) to further reduce dental plaque.

If you would like more information on denture care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Sleeping in Dentures.”




Fedele E. Vero, D.D.S., P.C.
Christine N. Fumo, D.M.D.
Alec J. Ganci, D.D.S

Yonkers, NY Family Dentist
South Bronx, North Westchester Cosmetic Dentist
General, Cosmetic and Implant Dentistry

626 McLean Avenue
Yonkers, NY 10705
(914) 476-0100
 

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